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Writing Genre Fiction

Date
Session / Presenter
Location / Time
Jun 06
Sat - 2020
Crisis Creates Us: YA Story Structure and Mapping
Daniel José Older
TBD
10:10am to 11:40am
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Presenter: Daniel José Older

How can taking a bird's eye view of the story help us make sense out of the complicated work of structure? In this workshop, we'll engage with turning points and the central heart of what gives a narrative meaning, exploring strategic approaches and discussing our own work and experiences with the process. Students are encouraged to bring a story of their own to diagram out and analyze.

Jun 06
Sat - 2020
Writing and Researching Historical Genre Fiction
Holly Day
TBD
1:40pm to 3:10pm
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Presenter: Holly Day

Are you a writer of historical fiction or nonfiction and you don’t know how or where to find information on the time period you’re writing about? This class will show you where to find textbooks, old newspapers, photographs, voice recordings, illustrations, photos and descriptions of historical and religious relics, and maps—ancient nautical maps to modern city maps--of all types to add authenticity and depth to period-based fiction and accuracy to historical nonfiction. Resources covered in this class will be available to find either online or in-person--this class is especially aimed at the researcher with a limited budget. The basics of compiling a bibliography will also be covered as well as how to get permissions for using photographs in published work.

Jun 06
Sat - 2020
Nailing the Spike: Creating a Compelling Short Story
April Eberhardt
TBD
3:20pm to 4:50pm
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Presenter: April Eberhardt

"Nailing the Spike" focuses on the quick and dramatic arc (i.e. the spike) required to make a short story jump out and grab the reader. Having read thousands of short stories as a reader for the Best American Short Stories series, and as former head reader for Zoetrope--All Story, Francis Ford Coppola's literary journal, April Eberhardt has developed a strong sense of the characteristics that distinguish successful short stories. We’ll discuss what a short story must accomplish in a brief form, how short stories differ from novels and novellas, and the ways in which short story trends have changed. We’ll also discuss ways to approach getting your short stories published. This workshop is suitable for aspiring and experienced short story writers.

Jun 07
Sun - 2020
American Women Crime Writers of the Mid-20th Century
Sarah Weinman
TBD
10:10am to 11:40am
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Presenter: Sarah Weinman

Sarah Weinman, author of The Real Lolita, previously edited anthologies of crime novels and stories by women published between World War II and the mid-1970s. In this session she'll discuss writers attendees may be familiar with, like Patricia Highsmith, Dorothy B. Hughes, and Margaret Millar, and those they may be less familiar with, including Nedra Tyre, Elisabeth Sanxay Holding, and Dolores Hitchens. What united these women was a relentless quest to chronicle America as it really was, not necessarily the America depicted in classic hardboiled crime fiction by the likes of Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, and James M. Cain. Their domain was more domestic, but still merciless and acute in depicting society's ills, and the terror that afflicted women and children in particular.

Jun 07
Sun - 2020
Context: Power, Politics and Worldbuilding in Fantasy Lit
Daniel José Older
TBD
1:10pm to 2:40pm
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Presenter: Daniel José Older

Place matters. How do we create meaningful worlds around the action of our stories? This interactive seminar uses the organizing concept of institutional power mapping to conceptualize nuanced literary landscapes. We will explore different kinds of power and how they can play out in a narrative structure.

Jun 07
Sun - 2020
The Archaeology of Fiction: Revision and Discovery
Aimee Lurye LaBrie
TBD
2:50pm to 3:50pm
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Presenter: Aimee Lurye LaBrie

You've finished a first draft of your short story or manuscript. Now, the pleasure (and pain?) of revision begins. Learn how to move your story from its creative genesis into a more fully realized form. By exploring the threads of theme and conflict that likely already exist in your draft, you can begin to find the heart of the story. We'll look at examples of early drafts from published authors to discover their strategies for revision. Participants are encouraged to bring a copy of an incomplete draft for in-class exercises focused on taking your work to the next level.