Date Track Session/Presenter/Description Location Time

Saturday, June 1, 2019

Writing Poetry

Working Words

The workshop focuses on expanding the writer's word choice.  Poets often use a few words over and over.  One way to break this pattern is to use different words--ones that have not been used.  This workshop uses an exercise to generate new poems and as a tool that the students can take with them.
For beginners.

Maple 10:50am to 11:50am

Saturday, June 1, 2019

Writing Poetry

Basic and Bold—The Uses of Contemporary Poetry

This Workshop is designed to engage participants with contemporary poets, many of whom are writers of color, and their different strategies to generate new work.  

The Workshop will be in two parts:

#1.  Participants will look at poems in the packet and discuss the work of those poets with whom they unfamiliar.

#2.  We will use vocabulary from two or three of the poems to generate new work.

We will use poems as catalyst for new works. Poems by Bojan Louis, Gregory Pardlo, Jennifer Bartlett, Marilyn Chin, Maureen Owen, Cheryl Boyce-Taylor, Sally Mao Wen, and  David Rivard may be included. Participants must be prepared to read and write, write and write.

At the end of this workshop, it is my hope that participants will have created poems that they feel good about and have learned about.
For advanced poets. 

Maple 1:55pm to 3:25pm

Sunday, June 2, 2019

Writing Poetry

The Unexpected Image

Every writer has personal obsessions, whether they realize it or not. Repeated metaphors, images, conflicts, etc. can all go in to making a poet's distinct body of work; however, it's also important to be aware and in control of personal cliches. In this class we will examine the obsessions of a few published writers, and will try to identify our own obsessions. We will use a series of exercises that help the writer play, experiment, and push past the boundaries of what they are used to writing. As Robert Frost said: “All metaphor breaks down somewhere. That is the beauty of it. It is touch and go with the metaphor, and until you have lived with it long enough you don’t know when it is going. You don’t know how much you can get out of it and when it will cease to yield. It is a very living thing. It is as life itself.” Students are encouraged to prepare original 3-5 poems. Early or rough drafts are OK -- these will be used as part of a writing exercise, and will not be shared or workshopped in class. Preferably, poems should be accessible on a laptop. Laptops are recommend.

Maple 10:10am to 11:40am

Sunday, June 2, 2019

Writing Poetry

Breaking the Habit

How can we expand our poetic vocabulary to include new and different syntax, structure, and voice? This workshop is aimed at beginners, but will be beneficial to anyone stuck in a rut of their design. We’ll look to poems as models and inspiration, play games, and participate in writing exercises all with one objective: break habits that are holding our writing back.   
For beginner poets

Magnolia 1:10pm to 2:40pm

Sunday, June 2, 2019

Writing Poetry

The First Line Says It All.

The opening of a poem can make or break everything. Where to begin? In this workshop, we'll look at poems by Louise Gluck, Richard Siken, and Terrance Hayes to learn how they infuse urgency from the get-go. We'll then try writing poems inspired by some of their strategies. 

Mulberry 2:50pm to 3:50pm