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Date
Session / Presenter
Location / Time / Track
Jun 05
Fri - 2020
Find Your Readers Book Marketing Master Class
Eva Lesko Natiello
TBD
1:00pm to 4:30pm
The Business of Writing
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Presenter: Eva Lesko NatielloTrack: The Business of Writing

Have you published a book but wish your sales were more robust? Perhaps your book is traditionally published and you're disappointed with the amount of marketing and PR your publisher is doing. Maybe you're self-published and don't know where to start or what to do. The hard truth is no matter which way you publish these days, authors need to market their books. Instead of thinking of that as a negative, get empowered by having a hand in your book’s success, learn to create visibility and buzz for your books and increase your readership and sales. Join Eva Natiello for the Find Your Readers Book Marketing Master Class—an immersive 3-hour workshop designed for all authors, indie or trade, introvert or extrovert, fiction or non-fiction. Eva will debunk the mysteries of book marketing so that you walk away with actionable marketing strategies that will help get your book noticed!

Jun 05
Fri - 2020
Using the Power of Myth to Energize Your Stories
Christopher Ernest Vogler
TBD
1:00pm to 4:30pm
Writing Fiction
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Presenter: Christopher Ernest VoglerTrack: Writing Fiction

Mythic stories touch us deeply with their rich imagery, associations and appeal to the senses. Hollywood story consultant Christopher Vogler will guide you through the labyrinth of mythic and fairy tale structures, and will offer techniques for accessing the hidden power of these ancient and beloved story forms. Writing exercises will show how you can involve the whole array of the senses to stir strong emotions in the bodies and minds of your readers.

Jun 06
Sat - 2020
Crisis Creates Us: YA Story Structure and Mapping
Daniel José Older
TBD
10:10am to 11:40am
Writing Genre Fiction
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Presenter: Daniel José OlderTrack: Writing Genre Fiction

How can taking a bird's eye view of the story help us make sense out of the complicated work of structure? In this workshop, we'll engage with turning points and the central heart of what gives a narrative meaning, exploring strategic approaches and discussing our own work and experiences with the process. Students are encouraged to bring a story of their own to diagram out and analyze.

Jun 06
Sat - 2020
Form and Content: Another Look
Billy Collins
TBD
10:10am to 11:40am
Writing Poetry
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Presenter: Billy CollinsTrack: Writing Poetry

While the content of a poem, insofar as it has any, is an expression of the poem’s interest in the world—be it love, Nature, injustice etc—the form of the poem, whether apparent in rhyme, cadence, echoing imagery or other patterning, is the poem expressing an interest in itself.  This workshop will be largely devoted to making sure both of these interests are visibly at work in the poems we discuss.  Really good poems often manage to strike a near balance between the two, the poem looking inward and outward at once.

Jun 06
Sat - 2020
Turning True Stories Into Page-Turners
Sarah Weinman
TBD
10:10am to 11:40am
Writing Creative Non-Fiction
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Presenter: Sarah WeinmanTrack: Writing Creative Non-Fiction

Do you have a true story you are dying to tell? If you’re consumed by research, have done all the reporting, but aren’t sure where your story starts, continues, or ends, join Sarah Weinman, the acclaimed crime journalist, editor, and author of The Real Lolita, in a workshop exploring how the best techniques of fiction — characters, setting, pacing, and more — can be used to craft true narratives.

As part of this workshop we'll discuss some great examples of narrative nonfiction in book and magazine form, and how they hold the readers' interest through structure and the sentence. Works may include Random Family, by Adrian Nicole LeBlanc; Bad Blood by John Carreyrou; Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann; and Furious Hours by Casey Cep; and "96 Hours" by Pamela Colloff.

The class will include craft discussion; an exercise; and Q&A.

Jun 06
Sat - 2020
We Want to Believe (or How to Lie Better)
Alex Dawson
TBD
10:10am to 11:40am
Writing Fiction
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Presenter: Alex DawsonTrack: Writing Fiction

A guy gets on stage and does a trick. Aztec Lady, Bullet Catch, Zig Zag Girl. It's a con. A dodge. The gun is made to fire blanks. The boxes are bigger than they seem. It's the person watching, their readiness to believe, that fills the deception with wonder and makes it magic. So, too, with writing. Fiction is a lie, by definition. And writers are liars. Shame on them. It's the reader's regard, their eagerness to give credence, that makes a story emotionally compelling and elevates it to art. A good lie rings true. And reveals truth. In the nineties, a poster hung above the desk of FBI agent Fox Mulder (and on the bedroom wall of every self-respecting X-phile): I Want to Believe. And it's true. We want to believe. In fact, we first believe, then, if the writing falls short (and if often does), we make a conscious effort to disbelieve. Whether you're writing about ordinary occurrences or an epic mytharc to rival X-files, the appearance of truth, that is to say, verisimilitude, is essential. We'll talk about concrete particulars and sensory details. About writing what we know (which simply means: if you don't know it, learn it). How an inside eye creates trust, what Coleridge might call "poetic faith." Good writers are farmers and mechanics and doctors and hunters. If we believe in the gun being cleaned, the Q-tip and the rifle grease, we're likely to believe in the werewolf at the door. We'll talk about putting the familiar (or natural) against the unfamiliar (or supernatural). The tangy smell of seaweed dying, for instance, alongside the metallic sheen of a mermaid. About credibility when accuracy is impossible (and it often is). What does battery acid taste like? Flat Sprite with a penny in it? Maybe. What does it feel like to have wings? To spontaneously combust? To turn invisible? Let's find out!

Jun 06
Sat - 2020
Pitchapalooza
The Book Doctors
TBD
11:50am to 1:30pm
General Session
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Presenter: The Book DoctorsTrack: General Session

Pitchapalooza is American Idol for books (only kinder and gentler). Twenty writers will be selected at random to pitch their book. Each writer gets one minute—and only one minute! Dozens of writers have gone from talented amateurs to professionally-published authors as a result of participating in Pitchapalooza, including Raul the Third, Ylonda Caviness, Stacy McAnulty, Judith Fertig, Gloria Chao, Nura Maznavi and Ayesha Mattu. At the end of Pitchapalooza, the judges will pick a winner. The winner receives an introduction to an agent or publisher appropriate for his/her book.

Jun 06
Sat - 2020
Collaborative Fiction Writing - Who Says You Have to Go It Alone?
April Eberhardt
TBD
1:40pm to 3:10pm
The Business of Writing
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Presenter: April EberhardtTrack: The Business of Writing

Fiction authors often assume the only way to write a great novel is to sit by themselves in a room, writing and reworking until the manuscript feels “finished”—all hard work, and difficult to assess when it’s done. Consider an alternative: creating a novel in collaboration with others. How does that work? How many co-authors are enough—or too many? Who makes the rules, who does the drafting, the editing, the knitting together? How do you find co-authors? How do multi-author disagreements get ironed out? And in the end, how do you publish something written by more than one author? Come learn more about this intriguing model from an agent who has worked with authors collaborating on manuscripts, and has seen up close what works, what bumps get in the way, how to resolve them—and how to succeed, and have fun in the process!

Jun 06
Sat - 2020
The Craft of Writing Literary Nonfiction: A “How-To” Workshop
Jeffrey Scott Copeland
TBD
1:40pm to 3:10pm
Writing Creative Non-Fiction
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Presenter: Jeffrey Scott CopelandTrack: Writing Creative Non-Fiction

This session will cover the following – and more:

  • The “Code” of Literary Nonfiction
  • Where and how to find/mine ideas for stories
  • How and where to conduct the research for Literary Nonfiction stories
  • Methods of creating the “Storyboard” for Literary Nonfiction (and many other genres as well)
  • How to avoid the pitfalls particular to this genre (there are many!)

Whether participants are beginners or experienced in writing Literary Nonfiction, all will receive practical suggestions/tips/advice that will help them as they develop their skills in this area.