Date Track Session/Presenter/Description Location Time

Saturday, June 2, 2018

N/A

Registration/Continental Breakfast

TBD 8:00am to 9:00am

Saturday, June 2, 2018

N/A

Keynote Presentation: Alice Hoffman

Creating a Fictional World

A novelist must create characters, as well as a plot that moves the story forward, but all of this must exist within a fictional world. How do writers create such a world?  Most writing teachers tell their students to write what they know. My great teacher Albert Guerard, who taught at Harvard for twenty years and then at Stanford for twenty more years, told his students something quite different: Write what you can imagine. This was hugely freeing to his students and to me. A writer did not have to write about his or her own life, which might be small and uninteresting. In fact, the whole world is open to a novelist. Imagination is everything.

TBD 9:00am to 10:00am

Saturday, June 2, 2018

N/A

Agent Pitch Meetings

Have an opportunity to meet for 10 minutes with agents, editors, and publishers. Sign up information will be available soon.

TBD 10:10am to 5:00pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Creative Non-Fiction

Writing for Broadcast

David Bianculli began writing for broadcast – specifically, for NPR’s Fresh Air with Terry Gross – more than 30 years ago. But before and concurrent to that, he also wrote for “print,” from newspapers and magazines to books and blogs. In this symposium, he’ll reveal what he learned about the differences between writing for different media… and will conduct an instant workshop where students can put those theories into practice, regarding both writing and (a key but often overlooked skill) reading.

TBD 10:10am to 11:10am

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Fiction

Intro to Short Writing Fiction

"Good guys wear black." - Harley T-shirt & manga maxim

I started writing and riding at around the same time. Six, maybe seven. Filling my tiny top spiral with stories, brapping about on a little 50cc pit bike, a yellow Suzy I shared with my brother. Forty years later, I'm still doing both, and I'm struck by how similar they are. Seriously. Ten writing/riding rules that will change (and maybe save) your life. Plus Johnny Cash and how "Boy Named Sue" is the only story model you'll ever need.

TBD 10:10am to 11:10am

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Genre Fiction

Writing Thrillers, Crime Novel

Whodunit? Whydunit? Wheredunit? This workshop will explore the internal machinations of the mystery novel and how to pick up the reader’s pulse. Our focus will be on the fundamentals: outlining, plotting and character development—as well as how to create a suffocating sense of suspense that compels one to keep turning the page, chapter after chapter, until the very end. 

TBD 10:10am to 11:10am

Saturday, June 2, 2018

The Business of Writing

Perfecting Your Pitch

A great pitch is one of the most powerful and underestimated tools any writer can have in his/her quest to be published successfully. From landing an agent and a book deal, to self-publishing well, to getting traction online, to attracting media, to convincing booksellers that they must carry your book, to letting readers know why they should buy your book, the perfect pitch is the goose that will lay your golden publishing egg. Find out how to craft and dynamite pitch. And be sure to bring your pitch with you, even if it’s far from perfect!

TBD 10:10am to 11:10am

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Poetry

Basic and Bold—The Uses of Contemporary Poetry–a Poetry Workshop

This Workshop is designed to engage participants with contemporary poets and the different strategies to generate new work.  While the focus is on African American poets, a range of poets will be under review.

The Workshop will be in two parts:

#1.  Participants will look at poems in the packet and discuss the work of those poets with whom they are unfamiliar.

#2.  We will use vocabulary from two or three of the poems to generate new work.

We will use two or three poems as catalyst for new works. Poems by Gwendolyn Brooks, Gregory Pardlo, Ada Limón, Lorenzo Thomas, Angela Jackson, Marilyn Chin, Maureen Owen, Cheryl Boyce-Taylor, Renato Rosaldo, Brenda Hillman, Latasha N. Diggs, Peter Covino, Joy Harjo, Major Jackson, and Charif Shanahan may be part of the packet.

 Participants must be prepared to read and write, write and write.

At the end of this workshop, it is my hope that participants will have created poems that they feel good about and have learned about.

TBD 10:10am to 11:10am

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing for Performance

Writing for TV

Creating a television show isn't just about coming up with a great concept; it’s about coming up with a great concept that will generate 100 episodes. This overview of television writing explores how teleplays differ from any other form of writing, what a “story engine” is, what a “logline” is, what a “showrunner" does, and why outlining is a vital part of the process. Finally, you’ll hear what it’s like to work inside a TV writers’ room, where a show's staff "breaks" stories for an entire season. Workshop participants will be invited to craft their own series loglines, so be sure to bring something to write with.

TBD 10:10am to 11:10am

Saturday, June 2, 2018

N/A

Lunch & Pitchapalooza

WHAT:   Pitchapalooza is American Idol for writers (only kinder and gentler). Twenty authors will be selected at random to pitch their book. Each writer gets one minute—and only one minute! Dozens of writers have gone from talented amateurs to professionally published authors as a result of participating in Pitchapalooza, including Genn Albin, our KC winner who got a 3-book mid-6 figure deal with Farrar Straus & Giroux.  

HOW: At Pitchapalooza, judges will help you improve your pitch, not tell you how bad it is. Judges critique everything from idea to style to potential in the marketplace and much, much more. Authors come away with concrete advice as well as a greater understanding of the ins and outs of the publishing industry. Whether potential authors pitch themselves, or simply listen to trained professionals critique each presentation, Pitchapalooza is educational and entertaining for one and all. From Miami to Portland, from LA to NYC, and many stops along the way, Pitchapaloozas have consistently drawn standing-room-only crowds, press and blog coverage, and the kind of bookstore buzz reserved for celebrity authors.

PRIZE: At the end of Pitchapalooza, the judges will pick a winner. The winner receives an introduction to an agent or publisher appropriate for his/her book.

TBD 11:15am to 1:00pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Creative Non-Fiction

Getting a Great Interview

Mark Twain grew to dread being interviewed so much, he wrote a wild comic sketch about the process, which he described as torture. More than anything else, Twain detested the monotony of answering the same stock questions posed by ill-prepared, ill-informed interviewers. How to avoid being the kind of interviewer who inspired Mr. Twain’s ire? Well, there is no one fool-proof method to guarantee a great interview – no one-size-fits-all approach. That’s because every interviewee poses a different challenge, and every interviewer approaches that challenge with a different set of skills. The variables are endless. Still, there are many sound ways to increase the odds of having a great interview. Mark Dawidziak will discuss some of these guidelines, drawn from the hundreds of interviews he has conducted for his many books and during a 40-year journalism career.

TBD 1:10pm to 2:40pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

The Business of Writing

Creating an Author's Webpage

Given how much commerce and communication take place online, now, an online presence is vital to any author. This session will outline some of the common modes of online presence, and give participants an opportunity to consider what kind of presence they wish—or have the energy!—to maintain. After that, the presenter will demonstrate how to create two basic types of website (blog-oriented and static) using a free Wordpress account, and briefly show a few other tools that can be used, such as Twitter and Weebly. There will be a hands-on segment of the workshop, to allow participants to work on creating or editing their own sites, so please bring your laptops or tablets!

TBD 1:10pm to 2:40pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Poetry

We are the Future: A Poetry Workshop Using Walt Whitman’s “Democratic Vistas”

In “Democratic Vistas” Whitman presents his ideas on Democracy, Culture and the “vistas” he proposes for a nation that has just concluded  the “Secession War” as he calls it.  The essay was published in 1870 just as Andrew Johnson was being removed from office; Reconstruction was taking place; and immigration was expanding.  In the paper, Whitman does what he always does, use words in illuminating or obscuring ways.  He often uses antique locutions, “Ye” for instance.  But the words offer poets stepping stones to new poems. 

TBD 1:10pm to 2:40pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing for Performance

Writing a Two-Character Play in 90 Minutes

Really! It's not hard! Learn the basics of playwriting through a streamlined process that allows you to create a brand new play in only 90 minutes! We'll create characters, stories, settings, conflicts and give you some new tools to take home.

TBD 1:10pm to 2:40pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Fiction

Creating a Book of Linked Short Stories

Linked short stories fall somewhere between a book of stories and a novel, while retaining some of the best qualities of both. They can move in time and in place and from character to character more freely than a novel, and can provide a richer, more complicated canvas than a book of short stories.

In our workshop we will create the outlines for two books of linked short stories, one character based and one place based. By the end of the class, students will have a better sense of what they can do to plot out a book of linked short stories, or how they can proceed forward from a story they have already written.

TBD 1:10pm to 2:40pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Genre Fiction

Writing Genre Fantasy

Genre fantasy is very different from science fiction, much less well understood, and possessed of its own set of pitfalls for the unwary writer. This workshop will help you to avoid those pitfalls. Going back to the basics of world-building, you will learn to shape your fantasy world into something that both convinces and makes sense, while still retaining the magic that drew you to it in the first place. Exotic and richly detailed though your fantasy world may be, it is still ruled by the basics of narrative. Luckily, those basics are simple and easily mastered, leaving you free to exercise your imagination to the limit.

TBD 1:10pm to 2:40pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Fiction

The Essence of Character

What is a character driven story? How do you create a character powerful enough to drive a plot? This one hour craft talk and discussion goes beyond the lists of facts to offer a method for creating a dynamic character.

TBD 2:50pm to 3:50pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Genre Fiction

Writing Romance Novels

As a multi-billion dollar industry and the largest segment of the paperback fiction market, there's no denying that romance sells. But why? Join New York Times and USA Today bestselling romance author Sarah MacLean for a workshop about the ins and outs of the most popular fiction genre -- how it's written, why it's read, and where it's going from here.

TBD 2:50pm to 3:50pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

The Business of Writing

How to Get Published TODAY: Big Five, Independent or Self-Publish

It's the greatest time in history to be a writer. There are more ways now to get published now than ever before. Yes, there are so many options, but they're all so confusing. This interactive seminar will break down the process of getting published by Big Five publishers like HarperCollins, Penguin, Random House, etc. You’ll get the skinny on landing a book deal with a well-respected independent publisher like Gray Wolf, Tin House, or Soft Skull. And finally, you’ll get the inside 411 on self-publishing. Then three writers will be chosen to pitch their books in ONE MINUTE. The Book Doctors will break down (in a kind and gentle manner) the strengths and weaknesses of the pitch itself, and suggest whether the author should try Traditional, Independent, or Self Publishing.

TBD 2:50pm to 3:50pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Poetry

Making Poetry Out of Everyday Life (Introductory Level)

As poets we often delude ourselves into thinking that we must reach for the big theme. Yet the best poets often find their themes in the objects that surround them daily. This workshop will focus on finding the poetic essence of daily life. We will read a couple of poems by master poets and work on a couple of exercises.

TBD 2:50pm to 3:50pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing for Performance

Adapting Your Work for Stage/Screen

We have brought our stories to the page. Now… how do we bring it to the stage? The big screen? Our workshop will explore how fiction makes the leap to film/television and find ways to adapt our own material for new mediums. By taking an in-depth look at previously adapted pieces and comparing the source material with their evolutionary counterparts, we will discuss what makes its way onto film and what should remain on the page—and how.

TBD 2:50pm to 3:50pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Creative Non-Fiction

Researching Tools, Tricks, and Treks

There are two types of research: the nuts and bolts type that enriches your storytelling with detail and authenticity, and the exploratory type that helps you find your story in the first place. This workshop examines both kinds of research while explaining where to begin, who to interview, how to interview, how much to use, and the big question… when to stop. 

TBD 2:50pm to 3:50pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing for Performance

Getting Produced (Advanced Level)

Okay. I've written my play. It's on paper. Now, what??? This class will give you tools and resources for reaching out and making connections with theatres so that you can get that play off the page and onto the stage where it belongs!

TBD 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Fiction

Mark Twain on Writing

Novelist William Dean Howells proclaimed that the writer born Samuel Langhorne Clemens was “the Lincoln of our literature.” Ernest Hemingway certainly viewed Mark Twain as a liberating force, famously stating that “all American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn.” And comedian-activist Dick Gregory said that Twain was “was so far ahead of his time that he shouldn't even be talked about on the same day as other people.” Think of the benefits of knowing this literary master’s secrets? But in fact, Twain kept no secrets when it came to the writing process. He was extremely generous with his thoughts on style, literary habits, and the writer’s role in society. Indeed, Twain constantly was writing about writing. Mark Dawidziak, the author or editor of five Twain-centric books, including Mark My Words: Mark Twain On Writing, will talk about how Twain’s lively advice can help guide and inspire writers more than 108 years after his death.

TBD 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Genre Fiction

Mastering the Art of Great Conflict

Mastering the Art of Great Conflict: We know that the wallflower makes the perfect heroine for the rake; that the vampire makes the perfect hero for the vampire hunter; that the thief makes the perfect match for the detective. These matches work because of their innate initial conflict, but how do we keep conflict alive for an entire book? Join New York Times best-selling romance author Sarah MacLean for a workshop on how to build and maintain great
conflict as you write. While the session uses romantic conflict to explain the concept, the session includes a broad discussion of conflict for all writers.

TBD 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Creative Non-Fiction

Editing, Revising, and Polishing Your Work (Advanced)

“Writing,” as the saying goes, “is revision.” This workshop will discuss many approaches to editing and revision, and how to engage with the revision process in a way that is as inspired as the initial, generative stages of your writing. We’ll look at before-and-after examples of radically revised published works. In-class exercises will be geared towards employing new editorial and revisionary devices for both micro and macro aspects of a work-in-progress. We will also discuss the process of working with editors at literary magazines and publishing houses.  

TBD 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

The Business of Writing

Using Social Media to Market Your Work

Coming Soon.

TBD 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Writing Poetry

How to Make Metaphors

“You draw your metaphors from whatever parts of the world you know,” Jane Hirshfield writes. In this way, metaphors are a product of proximity; we make use of what’s within our reach. But distance plays into metaphor in other ways, too. When comparing one thing with another, how far can the imagination stretch? How does the writer calibrate that distance correctly? Together, we’ll look at a range of examples from different writers to better understand how metaphors map onto the page. This will equip us to develop more effective and imaginative metaphors in our own work, the kind that grab editors’ attention.

TBD 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Reading and Signing Event

TBD 5:10pm to 7:30pm

Saturday, June 2, 2018

N/A

Reading & Signing Event

Attend an evening reading and signing event featuring Alice Hoffman, Chris Bohjalian, Michael Swanwick, and Pablo Medina.

TBD 5:10pm to 7:30pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

N/A

Registration/Continental Breakfast

TBD 8:00am to 9:00am

Sunday, June 3, 2018

N/A

Keynote Presentation: Chris Bohjalian

The Artist as Activist

Artists today are grappling with their place in the current social and political landscape: when is art activism and when is it escapism?  The fact is, as artists, we can take the risks that politicians won’t. Moreover, art can often reach people in ways that politics can't.  As E. M. Forster once said, “Fiction is truer than history because it goes beyond the evidence.”  That’s true of a lot of art, because a lot of art is about something that a lot of politics is not: empathy.  In this keynote, Bohjalian will discuss how he has used fiction to address issues as diverse as genocide, domestic violence, and teen homelessness.

TBD 9:00am to 10:00am

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing Fiction

Revising for Plot

You have your first or two down and you know what story you want to tell, but your plot isn’t working yet. The session offers an explanation and examples of necessary plot points that will make your story click into place. Craft talk and exercises.

TBD 10:10am to 11:40am

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing Genre Fiction

Science Fiction World-Building

When writing science fiction, it’s all too easy to get lost in the minutia of world-building at the expense of your story’s coherence. This workshop will teach you how to move from your nifty idea to a finished work. Starting with the most efficient modes of research, you will learn how to build a world around your idea and then populate it with characters that will embody the idea clearly and effectively. Along the way, you will also learn how much of your research to include in the finished story – and, more importantly, how much to leave out.

TBD 10:10am to 11:40am

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing Creative Non-Fiction

Writing Commentary, Critiques & Blogs

How do you write opinion pieces effectively, whether for print, broadcast, or the web? Veteran TV critic David Bianculli has some opinions on the subject – and will share them, while also having attendees write instant short mini-reactions of their own to material shown in the seminar. Then those reviews will be reviewed, and so it goes…

TBD 10:10am to 11:40am

Sunday, June 3, 2018

The Business of Writing

What is an Author Brand and How Can I Get One?

The onset of social media has made communicating with audiences and customers very easy but for writers it is not so simple.  Writing is a solitary discipline and yet, with the same marketing and publicity tools available to everyone, it is more important than ever for authors to distinguish themselves and their work from their colleagues.  The first step in doing this is to establish their own individual brands.  In this program Claire McKinney a veteran of the publishing industry will explain what a brand is in the book world; examples of successes and failures; and how writers can determine what kind of brand they need to be and how to build one. 

TBD 10:10am to 11:40am

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing Poetry

Shaping the Surface to Find Depth (Advanced Level)

Poems demand clarity; poems also reach for depth. How can we shape the surface of the poem, where clarity lies, so that readers can see to the bottom, where truth is dormant? We will read poems by Emily Dickinson and William Carlos Williams that illuminate surface and depth and try some exercises inspired by them.

TBD 10:10am to 11:40am

Sunday, June 3, 2018

N/A

Agent Pitch Meetings

Have an opportunity to meet for 10 minutes with agents, editors, and publishers. Sign up information will be available soon.

TBD 10:10am to 4:00pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing for Performance

The Art and Craft of Oral Storytelling

In this workshop, we'll explore the power and potential uses--both for creative writing and day-to-day communication--of storytelling. Through a series of exercises, attendees will learn techniques and tools to develop and deliver a true story from their lives. 

We'll touch on how to locate promising stories, how to structure them, and how to deliver them (without memorization) with confidence. Attendees will leave the workshop with the tools and know-how to continue to refine their stories. 

TBD 10:10am to 11:40am

Sunday, June 3, 2018

N/A

Publishing Panel Presentation

Enjoy an engaging presentation from a panel of publishers on options for publishing your work over lunch. Panel participants will be announced soon.

TBD 11:45am to 1:00pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing Genre Fiction

Writing for Children

"A children's story only enjoyed by children is a bad children's story." C.S. Lewis

We'll consider the controversies surrounding books that defy easy categorization (considering questions like: What exactly is a children’s book? Can a book be too smart for kids? Shouldn’t grownups read grownup books?) and discuss this notion of writing books filled with childlike wonder that transcend generational divides and provide adults (as well as children) with not just nostalgic, but new and novel experiences. Plus owning your dragons, putting awe on the page, avoiding the puppy machine, and why habanero peanut butter is the key to your success ("it's kick yo' butt hot"). And what DOES unicorn chop taste like? Find out!

TBD 1:10pm to 2:40pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing Fiction

Hooking Your Readers from the First Page -- and Why It Matters

Chris Bohjalian says that his fiction has changed enormously in the digital age -- and it has changed for a variety of reasons.  But the big one?  The spectacular renaissance in TV and Film.  The Sopranos.  Breaking Bad.  Fargo.  Sociologists and anthropologists have chronicled the way our attention spans have changed, but so have our expectations of narrative: Bohjalian believes that even literary fiction must begin with a bang (at least a metaphoric one).  And so in this workshop, he will explore with the writers how to begin a novel or a short story -- and how to hook your readers from the first page.

TBD 1:10pm to 2:40pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing for Performance

Writing Comedy

This workshop will focus on writing stand-up, sketch and one person show comedy. The fundamental crafts employed by comedy writers in these genres will be presented in my opening lecture. Next, there will be a question and answer period whose purpose will be to clarify participants' understanding of the crafts.  In the next section participants will choose which genre they want to explore and engage in a writing exercise for that genre that I will provide.

TBD 1:10pm to 2:40pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing Creative Non-Fiction

Getting Personal: Navigating the Opportunities and Challenges of the Personal Essay

In this workshop, we'll delve into the personal essay form, examining what makes a strong and marketable piece. Drawing on one's own personal experience for writing material offers up unique opportunities as well as a number of pitfalls. Here, we'll look at writers who have used the "I" in a variety of ways to deepen their work and connect with readers. We'll also uncover some of the common pitfalls of the genre, and touch on the basics of the personal essay market as well as what to know before you publish.

Attendees will be expected to read two essays (to be emailed beforehand) in preparation for the class. Attendees should also come prepared with a short (2-3 pages) personal essay (or start to an essay) that we will discuss during the session.

TBD 1:10pm to 2:40pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

The Business of Writing

Writer's Block and Other Occupational Hazards

When it comes to writing we are often our own worst enemies. I certainly was. Now it’s a little like going to the gym to get exercise. I just do it. And it’s much more fun than going to the gym. So I’ll talk briefly about my own self-defeating behavior of long ago and how I overcame it.

Then I’ll turn to those participating in this session and ask you to talk about what is getting in the way of your writing success. I believe it will be comforting to learn that many others suffer from the same “malady” and I know this will help everyone to discover a means to escape from it. To paraphrase President Franklin Roosevelt, You have nothing to fear but fear itself. 

TBD 1:10pm to 2:40pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing Poetry

A Circle of Associates: Writing Outward

This early-afternoon workshop, appropriate for both beginning and advanced poets, will focus on generating new work by participants. After examining various poems as models (by authors including Yehuda Amichai, Thomas Lux, Lucille Clifton, and Li-Young Lee), participants will be guided to compose poems that begin with a specific object and move outwards in the composition, ideally leading to kinds of truths they didn’t know they knew. We will keep in mind Richard Hugo’s advice to poets to go from the “triggering subject” to the generated or discovered subject. At the end of the session, we will respond to as many of the resultant poems as time allows.

TBD 1:10pm to 2:40pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing Creative Non-Fiction

Writing Memoir

In this workshop we’ll look at some exemplary scenes from celebrated memoirs with an aim to learn more about how writers process memory through narrative. Recalling an event or memory is one thing, yet to transform it into active scene and to do so with style and measured self-awareness is the task of the memoirist. We’ll analyze the distance between the memoirist’s narrative perspective and the events they depict, and assess the advantages and disadvantages of writing our stories from a first person, nonfiction perspective. The workshop will engage participants in several exercises based on the texts we discuss.

TBD 2:50pm to 3:50pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

The Business of Writing

What Does an Agent Do & How do You Know If You Need One?

Coming Soon.

TBD 2:50pm to 3:50pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing Poetry

A Fresh Break for Your Writing: Viewing a Poem's Line Breaks as Possibilities, Not Endings

Examining poems written in the last 50 years, we will explore how line break choices can augment a poem’s tone and implications by emphasizing images, sounds, and silences. Each participant should bring an original poem (no longer than twenty lines) he/she has had trouble revising or seeing clearly—a poem that one feels has latent power that hasn’t yet been brought to the surface. Towards the end of the session, participants will have an opportunity to recast their “stuck” poems into works that have more energy via more invigorated line breaks.

TBD 2:50pm to 3:50pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing for Performance

Performing Your Own Work

The fundamentals of performing each of these genres are related but distinct. In my opening lecture I will present and illustrate these fundamentals. Next, participants will perform the work they created earlier. Each participant will first get feedback on their writing and performing from me. This will be followed by a group discussion, and questions. The workshop will conclude with my closing remarks. 

TBD 2:50pm to 3:50pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing Fiction

Truth and Lies: Autobiography and Autobiographical Fiction

If your life is central to your story, but you’re unsure whether the material makes more sense to craft as a memoir or as a roman-a-clef, this workshop is for you.  We’ll discuss some key differences between the genres, especially in terms of voice and structure.

TBD 2:50pm to 3:50pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Writing Genre Fiction

Writing for Young Adults

Intelligent and searching, original and impassioned, lit from within and motivated by a desire to start a conversation about what it means to be alive, to choose, to yearn, to be different, to take a stand, to get along, and to hope, the best books written for middle grade and young adult readers are, most assuredly “big” books, the kind that live with readers long after the last pages have been read and the books slipped back onto the shelf. In this intensive (and fun) workshop, we’ll learn from some of the greatest MG/YA writers about the creation of voice, tone, and setting—and the secrets of narrative risk. We’ll read, share, write, and talk, and emerge with an enriched understanding of the possible. Open to all.

TBD 2:50pm to 3:50pm

Sunday, June 3, 2018

N/A

Writers' Open Mic

The Writers’ Open Mic is an afternoon where conference attendees can read their original works to a live audience or simply listen to other’s readings.

Please note, reading slots have been reduced to two minutes due to high demand. Sign-up will continue through Sunday up until the event. We would like to accommodate everyone’s request to read, so please respect the two-minute limit.

TBD 4:00pm to 5:00pm