Date Track Session/Presenter/Description Location Time

Saturday, June 3, 2017

N/A

Conference Check-In & Breakfast

TBD 8:30am to 9:00am

Saturday, June 3, 2017

N/A

Keynote Address

Join us for a morning with Dennis Lehane as he takes us through his journey as an award-winning novelist and screenwriter.

TBD 9:00am to 10:15am

Saturday, June 3, 2017

The Business of Writing

Writing a Query Letter

A query letter is typically the first step toward publication. It’s a writer’s initial contact with an agent or editor. In this workshop, we’ll cover how to construct and polish effective queries. Participants will be encouraged to write a draft of a query in class. They will also leave with an outline that can be used to craft future queries.

 

TBD 10:25am to 12:25pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Genre Fiction

Writing Thrillers, Crime Novels, & Mystery

First hour lecture focuses on plotting, voice, character creation, research resources, and what the publishing industry is looking for. Second hour is a group attendees' hands-on, step-by-step creation of a thriller.

TBD 10:25am to 12:25pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

N/A

Agent Meetings - Day 1

15-minute meetings with agents, editors, and publishers.

TBD 10:25am to 5:40pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Poetry

Poetry Workshop I

Description coming soon.

TBD 10:25am to 12:25pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Creative Non-Fiction

Research Skills: Interviewing

David Bianculli has interviewed newsmakers and celebrities for more than 40 years, for newspaper and magazine articles, for nonfiction books, and for NPR’s Fresh Air with Terry Gross. In this symposium, he’ll talk about how to prepare for and conduct an interview, how they differ from medium to medium, and some tricks for getting the most out of the time allotted. And as an instant workshop, someone in the class will be interviewed – or interviewing.

TBD 10:25am to 12:25pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Fiction

Intro to Fiction: The Structure of Writing

Whether your are an advance planner or the kind of writer who only sees as far as your “headlights” illuminate, eventually the shape of your novel asks to be defined. Structural inspiration can trace well worn patterns, such as “the hero’s journey,” but it can also locate itself in more surprising places. In this course we will thing about organic and inorganic forms and practice mapping from opening paragraphs we will craft together.

TBD 10:25am to 12:25pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Writing for Performance

My Evil Twin: Dealing with Fear as an Artist and Archetypes in Songwriting

Multiple Grammy Award winner Janis Ian will address songwriting as an art, not a contest, and discuss the theater, Stella Adler, and how she applies her studies of archetypical characters in these areas to her own work. She will also share her own experience with fear as an artist. "You question everything and everyone - your talent, your management, your career, your very worth.”  As Ms. Ian writes, “My crises are often punctuated by the Evil Twin's version of the truth, gleaned from every negative thing I've ever heard, read, or wondered about my life....Well, welcome to the wonderful world of being an artist."

TBD 10:25am to 12:25pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

N/A

Lunch & Pitch Slam with Agents and Editors

Description coming soon.

TBD 12:35pm to 1:50pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

N/A

Lunch & Small Group Conversations with Writers' Groups

Description coming soon.

TBD 12:35pm to 1:50pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

N/A

Lunch & Publishing 101: Basic Information You Need To Know as a Beginner in the Industry

The publishing industry is complex, and this workshop will give you a solid foundation of information as you begin your journey to becoming a published author. The session will cover: how the industry works; how fiction is sold; how nonfiction is sold; what agents do, if you need one, and how to find one; what editors/publishers do; how long it will take for your book to sell to a publisher; how long before it comes out as a published book once it's sold; what an advance is; when you receive royalty payments; does self-publishing help you attract an agent and/or a traditional publisher; what you can do to help sell your book. Publishing 101 truly is for those who know very little about the publishing industry—those writers just beginning to pursue their dream.

TBD 12:35pm to 1:50pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Writing for Performance

Writing for Stage and Screen: Getting Started

In the first 45-minutes, we will quickly cover the basics of three act structure and the primary elements that you need to consider for your script (including character, plot, story, setting, conflict, action). Then we will dive into short writing exercises that will help you generate new material so that you will leave with three new story ideas to begin writing immediately.

TBD 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

The Business of Writing

Crafting an Elevator Pitch

Description coming soon.

TBD 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Genre Fiction

Writing Outside the Box: What the Rules Are, and How to Break Them

New York Times bestselling author Eloisa James explains how to hook readers, drive sales, and build a reader community by designing plots that break out of the “box”—whether they're paranormal, contemporary, historical or continuities.  The key is to challenge yourself to be truly original, while staying marketable.  But where and how to be original?  We’ll talk about designing multiple books, pitching a series to editors, and creating that all-important reader excitement that drives the sales momentum of each book upward.

TBD 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Creative Non-Fiction

Storytelling: Living Your Artistic Life Out Loud

Janis Ian earned a Grammy in 2013 for Best Spoken Word Album for Society's Child: My Autobiography.  In this workshop, she will address the importance of "living your artistic life out loud": speaking from your own authentic experience, and not allowing yourself to be silenced.

TBD 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Poetry

Complicating the Poem

Developing writers often seem to stop too soon, finishing off a poem-in-progress with a quick gesture of closure before they’ve really explored the material. This workshop will focus on some techniques for digging deeper into the material of a poem, looking for ways to deepen and complicate the picture.

TBD 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Fiction

Character is Story and Story is Character

It’s common in literary theory to bifurcate character and story but it’s probably counterproductive as well. The journey a character takes is the story. What that journey reveals about the person taking it is how we define character. We’ll look at ways to create characters and ways to entwine them with a story that shows us who they are.

TBD 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Fiction

Balancing Dialogue and Narration/Finding Your Voice

Learn tricks to engage your readers and control the pace of your fiction with the right blend of dialogue and narration. We’ll discuss issues like tags, dialect, subtext, and the overall purpose of dialogue vs. narration. After tackling these structural issues, we will take a step back to consider the role of voice in your work and how to effectively capitalize on your unique strengths as writer.

TBD 4:10pm to 5:40pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Writing for Performance

Character Development for Stage and Screen

We will discuss the primary of elements of character development and then read and discuss select scenes to understand how the practical elements of character development play out on the page. We will conclude the workshop with a few short character creation exercises so that you can delve more deeply into a character that you’ve already created or create a compelling new one.

TBD 4:10pm to 5:40pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Genre Fiction

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Historical

At the end of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Arthur settles down to read his copy of the guide.  He comes across this entry:

The History of every major Galactic Civilization tends to pass through three distinct and recognizable phases, those of Survival, Inquiry and Sophistication, otherwise known as the How, Why and Where phases.  For instance, the first phase is characterized by the question, "How can we eat?" the second by the question "Why do we eat?" and the third by the question "Where shall we get lunch?"

Eloisa James’s workshop is for every writer who wishes she had a hitchhiker's guide to time-traveling:  anyone who is writing a historical for the first time – or who has written in one period and is contemplating another.

This talk will not give you pages of data about the difference between Jezebels and courtesans or (to be even more arcane) light-frigates, light-heeled women, light o'loves, light-skirts and light women.  This is a talk about asking the right kinds of questions, such as (with a nod to Douglas Adams): If I slept with my neighbor's wife, would anyone notice?

TBD 4:10pm to 5:40pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

The Business of Writing

Marketing Your Work

Description coming soon.

TBD 4:10pm to 5:40pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Creative Non-Fiction

Writing Commentary, Critiques & Blogs

How do you write opinion pieces effectively, whether for print, broadcast, or the web? Veteran TV critic David Bianculli has some opinions on the subject – and will share them, while also having attendees write instant short mini-reactions of their own to material shown in the seminar. Then those reviews will be reviewed, and so it goes…

TBD 4:10pm to 5:40pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Poetry

Poetry Workshop III

Description coming soon.

TBD 4:10pm to 5:40pm

Saturday, June 3, 2017

N/A

Reading/Signing Event

Description coming soon.

TBD 7:30pm to 9:30pm

Sunday, June 4, 2017

N/A

Free-Writing Exercise

“I would say that the moment an object appears in a narrative, it is charged with a special force and becomes like the pole of a magnetic field, a knot in the network of invisible relationshipsWe might even say that in a narrative any object is always magic.” - Italo Calvino

A series of short, tactual writing exercises, beginning with a prompt called the "Box of Wonder," which contains fifty, tiny story-starters.

TBD 9:00am to 9:45am

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Fiction

Library and Web Research

Libraries, in particular archives and special collections, hold a wealth of resources for writers in a variety of genres who may not only want to get their facts straight, but who wish to accurately capture a particular voice, time or place. In this workshop, attendees will learn about the array of historic materials available to them both online and in libraries, from correspondence and diaries to photographs and maps to genealogical records and how to access them. While the session will focus on the holdings of the New Jersey State Library and Rutgers University Special Collections and University Archives, information on how to find and access similar materials at other libraries, archives, historical societies and related repositories will also be covered.

TBD 9:55am to 11:55am

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Creative Non-Fiction

Writing the Personal Essay

Description Coming Soon

TBD 9:55am to 11:55am

Sunday, June 4, 2017

The Business of Writing

Creating an Author's Webpage

Description Coming Soon

TBD 9:55am to 10:55am

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Genre Fiction

Writing for Children

"A children's story that is only enjoyed by children is a bad children's story." C.S. Lewis

What is a children's book? We'll consider the controversies surrounding books that defy easy categorization (considering questions like: What exactly is a children’s book? Can a book be too smart for kids? Shouldn’t grownups read grownup books?) and discuss this notion of writing books filled with childlike wonder that transcend generational divides and provide adults (as well as children) with not just nostalgic, but new and novel experiences.

TBD 9:55am to 10:55am

Sunday, June 4, 2017

N/A

Agent Meetings - Day 2

15-minute meetings with agents, editors, and publishers.

TBD 9:55am to 4:40pm

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Poetry

Poetry Workshop IV

Beginner writers—and writers at all stages, for that matter—are often instructed to favor concrete imagery over abstraction.  “Show, don’t tell” remains one of the most popular directives heard in the workshop setting.  But to what extent must imagery or concrete detail overshadow abstract statement?  This session will examine some key poems that attempt to model and articulate an image-based aesthetic.  We will also explore instances when larger, sweeping statements assert their “rightful place” in a poem.  Then, we will write our own poems that aim to strike a balance between image and abstraction. 

TBD 9:55am to 11:55am

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Writing for Performance

Writing for Live Storytelling

In this interactive workshop, we'll practice everything you need to know about how to prepare a true story to be performed live or for the radio. This introductory workshop is a fit for veteran performers as well as writers who rarely perform. We'll work on useful skills to craft stories from your life that will capture your audience's attention.

TBD 9:55am to 11:55am

Sunday, June 4, 2017

The Business of Writing

Writer's Block and Other Occupational Hazards

Writer’s Block and its associated occupational hazards is a near universal ailment (let’s call it the “common cold”) of writers, but, I think, just as easily overcome. Getting down to one’s writing is a little like going to the gym. “Just Do It!” about sums it up. Also, one has to give up the pretensions of being a “genius” and realize that writing a book is a little like building a house. It can’t be done all at once—it is a board by board or brick by brick process. Earlier in my career I suffered a serious case of it. It’s like any other neurotic behavior. Now I just write. Hopefully, I’ll be able to give those attending this session tips on how to “just do it” too.

TBD 10:55am to 11:55am

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Genre Fiction

Writing for Young Adults

From Twilight to The Hunger Games, young-adult fiction has become a flourishing market. We’ll discuss the unique challenges and key factors of writing for a teen audience.

TBD 10:55am to 11:55am

Sunday, June 4, 2017

N/A

Lunch Panel re: Publishing Options

The writer's goal is not to be "published," so to speak, but rather to be read; that is to say, to put work in a place where a stranger (or, indeed, a million strangers) can encounter it. Publishing, then, is not an end, but a means. The panel will discuss the pros/cons of traditional publishing, boutique publishing, self/private publishing, and e-book/digital publishing.

TBD 12:05pm to 1:20pm

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Fiction

Writing the Short Story: The Big Challenge of the Little Story

Ernest Hemingway perhaps holds the record for the shortest story ever written : “For sale: Baby shoes, never worn.” Whether you want to write micro-fiction (up to 100 words), flash fiction (100, 1000 words), a short story (1000-7500 words), a novelette (7500 – 20000) or a novella ( 20000 – 50000), just like a novel, short fiction takes on a shape inherent to its thematic resonance. Learn how to balance dialogue and plot and how to develop the skills necessary to richen the space you invite readers into.

TBD 1:30pm to 3:30pm

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Creative Non-Fiction

Travel-Writing

A key thing to realize about travel writing is that it needn’t be about travel to conventional tourist spots. Nor does it have to be about traveling by plane, staying in hotels, and informing the reader about cool places to eat. The main thing is adventure, and this may happens as often in the wilds as in great cities. Also, sometimes it is travel through your own immediate neighborhood (example Henry David Thoreau’s essay “Walking”). And sometimes the finest travel writing .has a quality of serendipity—wandering rather than traveling with a specific purpose in mind. My own specialty in travel writing, I suppose, would be what I call “Urban Adventure,” and I’ll talk some about that and, if there is time, share a film concerning it.

TBD 1:30pm to 3:30pm

Sunday, June 4, 2017

The Business of Writing

Using Technology Tools for Writers

This presentation will outline some useful tools for two different areas of a writer’s life: research and do-it-yourself. Research, being an ongoing and never-ending element of writing, can result in a lot of scattered notes and materials, so we will examine some tools for organizing all that information. Self-publishing is an increasingly popular outlet, both for primary distribution and for supplemental distribution of “off-brand” works, so we will examine some of the tools that can help both tech-veterans and tech-beginners to produce professional-quality ebooks and for-paper manuscripts. This session will include time for attendees to try out a few of these tools hands-on, so please bring your laptops or devices!ebooks and for-paper manuscripts. This session will include time for attendees to try out a few of these tools hands-on, so please bring your laptops or devices!

TBD 1:30pm to 3:30pm

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Poetry

Learning from Great Poets

Reading as a poet means figuring out how a poem is put together, paying attention to the many elements that contribute to the 

experience of a satisfying poem. We’ll read a few superb poems by contemporary poets, looking under the hood, as it were. And we’ll look for the place where those poems become more dimensional, opening into larger meanings. Then we’ll write, and see what strategies we might try to make use of in our own writing.

TBD 1:30pm to 3:30pm

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Genre Fiction

Graphic Media vs. Comic Books

Description coming soon

TBD 1:30pm to 3:30pm

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Writing for Performance

Wright-ing the World

Description Coming Soon

TBD 1:30pm to 3:30pm

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Open Mic Reading Event

Description coming soon

TBD 3:40pm to 4:40pm